Translation of “We” in Marriage

men-vs-womenAs a writer, I understand the importance of language barriers. When my friends and family talk, I often find myself observing their mannerisms and analyzing their speech. This all plays a large role in my writing because with language, it’s not what you say but how you say it. For readers to understand the how, the writer must be clear and concise.

You’d think these rules apply to marriage too, but they don’t. Couples rave about the importance of “communication” but we don’t realize its limits or functions.

For example, do you know there are language barriers between men and women? Not to mention, the cultural differences makes a simple word like “we” difficult to translate.

Men and women interpret “we” in various ways. When a man says “we”, 50% of the time, he’s talking about himself and his wife. The rest of the time, he’s talking about himself. The 50-50 rule applies to women with a slight variance. 50% of the time, they’re talking about the relationship, and the other times they’re referring to their husband.

Let’s look at some real life situations:

Your husband walks into the room and says, “We should go out to eat.”

That generally means, we should go out to eat and I’m probably driving. I guess I should pay too, huh?

Your wife walks into the room and says, “We should go out to eat.”

That generally means, you should take me out to eat. Sometimes they’ll add, “What do you want to eat?” and allow you to filter through a list of restaurants until you reach the one they enjoy.

More examples? Kay!

Your husband says, “We should do something about the broken window.”

That often means he’ll have to pretend to fix it until he eventually hires a contractor.

Your wife says, “We should do something about the broken window.”

That often means, YOU should hire someone because you know your handyman skills are lacking.

Remember fellas, women are from Venus, men are from reality. Unfortunately, we need them to focus. That’s why nothing ever gets done.

 

Update: I had a penpal ask, “Are you and your wife okay?” To that I can only reply, oh gosh, yes! This is an analysis for all marriages, not just my own. I like pointing things out and exaggerating just to laugh while writing. The interpretation of “we” is actually something several comedians have said in the past. This is my personal twist to it.

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